Cars Found Permanently Stealing Personal Data

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Modern cars utilize more than 60 computer systems to function, many of which are related to infotainment systems. These systems connect to users’ cellphones by Bluetooth and USB, and have been found collecting information with users’ knowledge. A wide array of personal information can be transmitted, including phone books, call logs, photos, messages and social media feeds. This information is not only transferred but permanently stored with your car’s infotainment systems. In most cases, you cannot delete the transferred information.

We had one of our digital forensics experts, Nick Dearman, weigh in on a few easy ways to prevent your car from copying your cellphone’s data:

  • Clear your address book via the Bluetooth menu. When the system tries to copy this data, there won’t be anything to transfer.
  • Make your GPS inaccurate when you can. You can accomplish this by:
    • Setting your home address to a nearby business. 
    • Setting the GPS list of the places you visit most to a different location so if someone obtains your data, they won’t have an accurate read on your habits.
  • Save your photos, messages, and any sensitive information on an external file and regularly clear out your phone. No data will be transferred if there is nothing to transfer.

While there is currently no way to have a third party wipe any transferred data within the car systems, following these preventative measures will help stop it from taking any more information. To read the original article, click here.

If you have been the victim of digital information hacking, call McCann Investigations at (877) 302-8133.  We will provide a free consultation and outline the steps you and your response team need to take to gather and maintain the evidence you need to pursue litigation or an insurance claim. We can also explain the critical use of an licensed investigator to perform the forensic investigation and provide an objective opinion on the origination and scope of the compromise scam.

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